CLARAVIS GEOFFROYI: SHINING A LIGHT ON FORGOTTEN SPECIES

Some birds in the Atlantic Rainforest are naturally rare while others are little known mainly due to the absence or insufficient studies on these species. For this reason, many species become threatened with extinction without people realizing it. This is what happened with the purple-winged ground dove (Claravis geoffroyi).

The bird has this name because on its wings it has patches of metallic brilliance that resemble “mirrors”, and it is possible to observe bright reflections when it beats its wings. The dove feeds on bamboo flowers, seeds, and fruit with lots of pulp such as papaya, and grass seeds in open fields.

CLARAVIS GEOFFROYI: SHINING A LIGHT ON FORGOTTEN SPECIES

Some birds in the Atlantic Rainforest are naturally rare while others are little known mainly due to the absence or insufficient studies on these species. For this reason, many species become threatened with extinction without people realizing it. This is what happened with the purple-winged ground dove (Claravis geoffroyi).

The bird has this name because on its wings it has patches of metallic brilliance that resemble “mirrors”, and it is possible to observe bright reflections when it beats its wings. The dove feeds on bamboo flowers, seeds, and fruit with lots of pulp such as papaya, and grass seeds in open fields.

The distribution of the species in Brazil ranges from the south of Bahia all the way to Santa Catarina, but the truth is that it has been a long time since someone has seen this dove, which leads us to believe that it is extinct, though this assumption has not yet been confirmed with there always being a doubt, or hope, that this species will show up again.

Among the reasons that may have led this dove to the brink of extinction, or to actually be extinct, are urban expansion, monoculture, hunting, and illegal capturing.

Claravis comes from the Latin “Clarus, clarens” meaning bright, clear, brilliant, and “avis” meaning bird. Parque das Aves is determined to work so that the loss of the Claravis not be in vain, but that it shed light on the path for the conservation of many Atlantic Rainforest birds. Parque das Aves’ new motto after discovering that the Claravis geoffroyi became extinct is “to shine a light on forgotten species”.

 

Av. das Cataratas, 12450
Foz do Iguaçu – PR
ao lado do Parque Nacional

 

Fone +55 45 3529-8282

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Av. das Cataratas, 12450
Foz do Iguaçu – PR
ao lado do Parque Nacional

 

 

Fone +55 45 3529-8282

Desenvolvido por